horizonrecords

It was a great Swiftian irony that the shining moment of realization that is Ground Trouble Jaw first saw it's release as a modest, digital-only EP in 2008. Here we right that wrong, and pair it with 2011's Walt Wolfman EP, very much a spiritual twin of Ground Trouble Jaw. Ground Trouble Jaw is the lens that pulls Swift's catalogue into a focused oeuvre. It was the first release that folded the tireless, vying personalities of Richard Swift's art - the art brut R&B of Onasis; the John Fante saloon player of The Novelist; the Brill Building songcraft of Dressed Up For the Letdown - into a singular, succinct artistic statement. Here is a man discovering at once his own capacity for timelessness. The triumphant, Sly Stone burner "Lady Luck" feels like a song your heart knew before you did, a ripe jazz apple that Swift plucked on a stroll through the orchard. You can feel his joy and the responsibility of his personal discovery. You can imagine a not-to-distant future in which parents and children slowdance together at weddings to the childhood sweetheart doo-wop of "Would You." The electric artistic breakthrough is palpable. Walt Wolfman's blown-out, basement R&B speaker-shredders are not for the faint of heart. Highlight of the set, "MG 33" is a raw and ghostly trance, a blast of kinetic energy and that jazz apple smoke blown right in your face. The quasi-title track "Walt Whitman" is a cryptic salute to Whitman, whose American lineage of primal, urgent art can be traced to include Kerouac and Ray Johnson, Bo Diddley and Beefheart - right on through to Swift himself. He was an outsider-pop wanderkind who could do more with one worn, old mic than most men could with a high-end studio, taking "the holy moment" and making it eternal.
It was a great Swiftian irony that the shining moment of realization that is Ground Trouble Jaw first saw it's release as a modest, digital-only EP in 2008. Here we right that wrong, and pair it with 2011's Walt Wolfman EP, very much a spiritual twin of Ground Trouble Jaw. Ground Trouble Jaw is the lens that pulls Swift's catalogue into a focused oeuvre. It was the first release that folded the tireless, vying personalities of Richard Swift's art - the art brut R&B of Onasis; the John Fante saloon player of The Novelist; the Brill Building songcraft of Dressed Up For the Letdown - into a singular, succinct artistic statement. Here is a man discovering at once his own capacity for timelessness. The triumphant, Sly Stone burner "Lady Luck" feels like a song your heart knew before you did, a ripe jazz apple that Swift plucked on a stroll through the orchard. You can feel his joy and the responsibility of his personal discovery. You can imagine a not-to-distant future in which parents and children slowdance together at weddings to the childhood sweetheart doo-wop of "Would You." The electric artistic breakthrough is palpable. Walt Wolfman's blown-out, basement R&B speaker-shredders are not for the faint of heart. Highlight of the set, "MG 33" is a raw and ghostly trance, a blast of kinetic energy and that jazz apple smoke blown right in your face. The quasi-title track "Walt Whitman" is a cryptic salute to Whitman, whose American lineage of primal, urgent art can be traced to include Kerouac and Ray Johnson, Bo Diddley and Beefheart - right on through to Swift himself. He was an outsider-pop wanderkind who could do more with one worn, old mic than most men could with a high-end studio, taking "the holy moment" and making it eternal.
656605038711

Details

Format: Vinyl
Label: SELY
Rel. Date: 04/05/2019
UPC: 656605038711

Ground Trouble Jaw / Walt Wolfman
Artist: Richard Swift
Format: Vinyl
New: Available $18.98
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Would You
2. Lady Luck
3. The Bully
4. The Original Thought
5. A Song For Milton Feher
6. Whitman
7. MG 333
8. Laugh It Up
9. Zombie Boogie 1
10. Out ; About 1
11. Drakula (Hey Man!) 1
12. St. Michael

More Info:

It was a great Swiftian irony that the shining moment of realization that is Ground Trouble Jaw first saw it's release as a modest, digital-only EP in 2008. Here we right that wrong, and pair it with 2011's Walt Wolfman EP, very much a spiritual twin of Ground Trouble Jaw. Ground Trouble Jaw is the lens that pulls Swift's catalogue into a focused oeuvre. It was the first release that folded the tireless, vying personalities of Richard Swift's art - the art brut R&B of Onasis; the John Fante saloon player of The Novelist; the Brill Building songcraft of Dressed Up For the Letdown - into a singular, succinct artistic statement. Here is a man discovering at once his own capacity for timelessness. The triumphant, Sly Stone burner "Lady Luck" feels like a song your heart knew before you did, a ripe jazz apple that Swift plucked on a stroll through the orchard. You can feel his joy and the responsibility of his personal discovery. You can imagine a not-to-distant future in which parents and children slowdance together at weddings to the childhood sweetheart doo-wop of "Would You." The electric artistic breakthrough is palpable. Walt Wolfman's blown-out, basement R&B speaker-shredders are not for the faint of heart. Highlight of the set, "MG 33" is a raw and ghostly trance, a blast of kinetic energy and that jazz apple smoke blown right in your face. The quasi-title track "Walt Whitman" is a cryptic salute to Whitman, whose American lineage of primal, urgent art can be traced to include Kerouac and Ray Johnson, Bo Diddley and Beefheart - right on through to Swift himself. He was an outsider-pop wanderkind who could do more with one worn, old mic than most men could with a high-end studio, taking "the holy moment" and making it eternal.
        
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