local scene

We are down with the local sound; music from Upstate Carolina's, both current era releases and heritage artists! Stocking and celebrating artists and bands either currently from this area or whose history had a chapter in the Western Carolinas.

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180gm deluxe vinyl LP pressing. Recorded with a single microphone by Elektra founder Jac Holzman over two nights in a converted Manhattan church in late 1955, Josh at Midnight finds White delivering spare, impassioned performances of a dozen spirituals and blues numbers. The artist is accompanied throughout the sessions by noted jazz bassist Al Hall and baritone vocalist Sam Gary. The Josh at Midnight reissue was mastered with the participation of original producer Holzman, as well as legendary engineer Bruce Botnick and fabled mastering engineer Bernie Grundman. The Josh at Midnight reissue is a labor of love for Ramseur Records founder Dolphus Ramseur, who's been a committed White fan since childhood, when he first heard Josh at Midnight's lead track "St. James Infirmary" on a local radio station's blues show. White's music has remained a touchstone in Ramseur's life ever since. After meeting Jac Holzman through their mutual association with the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Ramseur became determined to restore Josh at Midnight to the vinyl marketplace with the same attention to quality and detail for which Ramseur Records has become known.
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For a lot of reasons, Cease to Begin is the perfect title for this new record. Not only do the songs themselves weave this theme through the record, but stopping and starting anew is also a reflection of the past year and a half for Band of Horses. The songs are strikingly beautiful, if less elliptical and more straightforward, with more sophisticated arrangements than the last record.
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RAMBLIN RECORDS - MARSHALL TUCKER BAND The Marshall Tucker Band is the self-titled debut album by The Marshall Tucker Band, a country rock-oriented Southern rock band. It was recorded in 1973 in Macon, Georgia, at Capricorn Studios. 2017 Ramblin Records release.
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Adia Victoria

Silences [LP]

Vinyl: $17.98 UNAVAILABLE

MP3 Album: $7.99 Download

Two years after the release of her critically-acclaimed debutBeyond the Bloodhounds, Nashville-based modern blueswoman Adia Victoria returns with Silences. The albumwas recorded withAaron Dessner(The National) at his studio in upstate New York. Throughout the album's 12 tracks, Victoria brings the topics of mental illness, drug addiction, sexism, and all the elements that consume the day-to-day lives of women attempting to make a world of their own.

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The songs on Amanda Anne Platt & The Honeycutters blend the band's old-school country roots attitude with their shared influences of rock and folk. Amanda says of the album, "I think it's just about life and all that that entails. Including but not limited to death, strangers, birthdays, money, leaving, arriving, seasons, corruption, and love."
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Cootie Stark

Sugar Man

CD: $21.98 UNAVAILABLE

MP3 Album: $9.99 Download

Cootie Stark is one of the last authentic Piedmont blues guitarist/singers alive today. He learned his songs at the feet of the originators of Piedmont Blues - Baby Tate, Pink Anderson, Walter Phelps, Peg Leg Sam and Blind Sammy Doolie. Cootie Stark has a repertoire of 100's of Blues and Gospel songs, making him one of the last direct links to a South long gone. 'I've been playing guitar for 50 years,' reports Stark, 'I started beating on cans before I got a guitar and my mother told me I was singing since I was a baby.' Although music was always in the forefront, the life of a transient bluesman is hard on the body and hard on the pocket - after years on the road, Cootie was left with little money and a dwindling audience for the deep-rooted blues that defined his style. In the 1980's, the blind Stark settled into the Woodland Homes Projects in Greenville, NC. 'By then, the real Piedmont blues was pretty much gone,' he says. 'All them guys were dead and gone and I wasn't making no headway' In the spring of 1997, Music Maker founder Tim Duffy heard Cootie Stark playing electric guitar and singing Fats Domino songs. Duffy questioned Stark about his knowledge of the old songs and was blown away to find himself face-to-face with a Piedmont Blues original. Within months of hooking up with Duffy, Cootie had a new acoustic guitar and a promising career. Stark has been universally praised in his first years as an international blues figure. His abrasive, percussive guitar style melds with a vocal arsenal that ranges from a roughhewn gospel shout to a tight, pretty vibrato. Both European and American concert-goers have been held captive by Stark's raw and powerful performances. On his first recording, SUGAR MAN, listeners receive the true, oral tradition of the blues. Stark's timeless versions of familiar and obscure songs show us that deeprooted blues are still alive and vibrant.
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Keith Davis

Davis, Keith : Presence

CD: $18.98 UNAVAILABLE

MP3 Album: $9.99 Download

About the tunes: Roswell's Rude is a loving, if tongue in cheek, tribute to Herbie Nichols and Roswell Rudd. Roswell was kind enough to share copies of some of Herbie's leadsheets written in Herbie's own hand. Not Is is in changing meters, with a solo vamp in seven (mostly!). Waltz for Don is for the great Canadian bassist/pianist Don Thompson, with whom I had the good fortune to study at the Banff Jazz Workshop in 1985. Go is a free improvisation. Raja Numia was also included on my trio CD, Still. A mystery! Holy Moses is for Ra-Kalam Bob Moses, musician, visionary, friend and Master of the Drum-niverse! Holly is for my friend and counselor, Holly. Diffraction is a science experiment, percolating in the back of the fridge for quite a while. Sammy's Rhumba is for my second amazing son, Sammy! Be-Bob is a bebop tune, for my good friends Bob, Bob, and Bob, and for all Bobs everywhere! Dark Light, cuz love is sometimes both. Funded in part by a grant from the Metropolitan Arts Council, which receives funding from the City of Greenville, BMW Manufacturing Company LLC, Michelin North America, Inc., SEW Eurodrive and the South Carolina Ans Commission with support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of SC. Thanks Alan Ethridge, and especially Kim Sholly, of MAC, who led me by the hand through the grant process. I would like to thank Terry Norris of T.L. Norris Gallery, Beth Lee, Bernie Ellis, and Tom and Debra Strange for their contributions to my fundraising effort, and for their friendship and support. Cameron Fitzpatrick is an awesome engineer and a good friend. Scott Wynne is in charge of the Robert F. Gilley Studio at Appalachian State University. My Taiji brother Bob Schlagal and his lovely wife Kathy let me stay with them during the project, and were the first listeners to the studio mix. Tim Winecoff, Taiji brother and friend, helped me me wind-down with some great practice after two intense days in the studio. My long time friend and teacher, Matt Kabat, has offered support and vision all along the way, along with Heather, who did a great job designing the graphics for this project. Dr. Yang Yang, is a continuing source of direction and inspiration. Judy Hanson, Taiji sister extraordinaire, has been here all along the way. Holly Kraus, my friend and counselor, has helped me keep on the not quite direct path, but something resembling a path nevertheless. Ron Brendle and Justin Watt, my trio mates. What a blast every time we make music together! It's alive! Mark Stallings, mastering master and new friend. Akos Major, wonderful photographer, and Taiji brother-from-another-mother. Frank Zipperer, thanks for the wonderful 'live action' photo, and your ever-Presence for Jazz! Paul and Michelle Westlake, Mason Thomas, Tom Bresnick, what can I say, Bob? Billy Degnats, my big brother, and Suzanne, who keeps my accounts, both physical and metaquizzical. Love and gratitude. Art Beam....Vertex T....Hilton Belvedere....Uplet master and expounder on all things cosmic and terrestrial. Kari Gaffney, my wonderful publicist. Ra-Kalam Bob Moses! Frank Kimbrough, the great pianist, offered the best advice ever for surviving in the recording studio, 'Stay away from the coffee machine!' Thanks! Art Lande, Marilyn Crispell, Greg Tardy, thanks for listening. Thanks to all my relatives who have offered their love and support, especially Terry and Mary Lynn Hunt, Teresa Davis, Todd Oliver, and Kimble Oliver. To my brother Alan and sister Traci, my Love and gratitude. Thanks to my friends and colleagues at Furman, especially David Gross, for helping me learn how to play the piano, and Michael Vick for the support and technical assistance. All the other friends who have provided support and inspiration, thank you! My awesome kids, Tadji and Sam! Love always! And, finally, 'Sailor' Bob Adamson, for his Presence...
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'Lieb' is for the great Dave Liebman, with whom I had the opportunity to study and play at the Banff Jazz Workshop in 1985. New Beginning is about just that! Chrysalis is a silk cocoon, for an old friend, close to my heart. Elis is for the great samba singer from Brazil, Elis Regina. Taiji Camp is inspired by the experience of being at Taiji camp, led every year by Master Yang Yang. Raja Numia is a mystery, inspired by a drum groove by the great Bob Moses, and the wonderful pianist Steve Kuhn. Tadjimon is for my oldest son, Tadji. Suzy's Waltz is for Susan, and old friend. Tadji's Groove was written with the assistance of Tadji, on drums. (Now I have to write some for Sammy!).
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King Cotton & The Remnants

Misery Index

CD: $11.98 UNAVAILABLE

MP3 Album: $9.99 Download

The musicians in King Cotton and The Remnants have been playing together in various bands for over 30 years. Beginning their current musical venture in 2007, the band has released two albums, 2008's "Borderline Brilliant!" and the recent 2012 release, "The Misery Index." Their sound calls upon the best musical traditions of the South and manifests the sentiments of a decaying and broken American landscape like the fallow fields of modern Dixieland. Here is a recent review by Dan Armonaitis of GoUpstate.com's '85-26' blog: 'Just before I embarked on a vacation earlier this month, I received a copy of "The Misery Index." I dug it upon first listen, and the album became a staple of the road trip. The music consists of jangly, roots-flavored pop that should appeal to those who enjoy the Traveling Wilburys or perhaps John Hiatt. Unbelievably catchy yet lyrically pensive, "The Misery Index" would also fit nicely next to recent works by the aforementioned Matthew Knights Williams. All of the songs are terrific, but I particularly have a fondness for a line in a rollicking Carr-penned tune called "Choagie." It's hard to top "Fire up the jitney, put on some Gene Pitney for the road/In a town without pity, you've got to grab what you see. ..." Nice.'
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